Resources

In this section, the Melbourne Press Club provides a guide with links to some of the most useful web sites in the world to help members become better journalists, connect with their colleagues in Australia and around the world and tune into the debate on professional issues.

These listings are divided into six categories: journalism tools, journalism associations, journalism education, awards, news sites and quotes.

We are also highlighting a useful journalism resource every week in our new 'Top Tools' feature.

13 July 2011

Document Cloud is an online tool that enables you to upload, store, share and publish documents online.  

Document Cloud's homepage

In many ways it is like Scribd, a document sharing website which we have previously highlighted, but whereas Scribd is intended to make online reading in general easier DocumentCloud was built specifically with journalism in mind.

6 July 2011

Audioboo lets you record up to five minutes of audio from your computer or phone and easily upload the file online. From there you can embed it on a website or share it through social networks like Facebook and Twitter.

Audioboo homepage

29 June 2011

If you are new to Twitter and don't know how to approach the microblogging website, Twitter for Newsrooms (#TfN) provides a great introduction.

Twitter for newsrooms

The team at Twitter have put together this online resource to help journalists and news organisations unlock their product's potential.

22 June 2011

If you ever find yourself overwhelmed by all the stories that appear in your Facebook news feed, your Twitter feed and your Google reader and can't decide what's worth reading, Summify is a great way to filter out the noise. 

Summify takes the incoming content from Twitter, Facebook and Google Reader, weighs up what's important and then sends you an email digest once a day featuring links to five of the top stories it thinks you should check out. 

Summify's homepage

15 June 2011

Bundlr is a curation tool that lets you ‘clip’ articles, photos and other online content and aggregate it into a bundle. This bundle presents the clips in a neat gridlike format and can be shared via social media or embedded on external websites.

Bundlr's homepage

8 June 2011

If you want to quickly translate a passage of text from another language into English, Google Translate is a very useful tool. 

Google Translate

1 June 2011

If you regularly transfer files between your home computer, work computer, smartphone and tablet device but have trouble keeping track of everything, Dropbox is the resource that you've been looking for.

Dropbox

25 May 2011

If you want to share your email address online on social networks or discussion boards but don't want to attract spambots, Scr.im helps you screen emails.

As more and more journalists use social networks and discussion boards to find contacts for stories, email addresses are often given out online to help establish contact with potential sources. Whilst this is an effective way to make contact - particularly when the source is overseas - there is a risk that spambots and email harvesters will obtain your email address and bombard you with unwanted messages.

scr.im's homepage

18 May 2011

If you want to keep track of what’s being said about a person, topic, company or place online but have neither the time nor the inclination to run endless Google searches to see what’s new, a Google Alert is a great way of making these results come to you.

Google Alerts homepage

11 May 2011

If one of the first things you do when you go on the Internet is check your favourite local and international news websites, blogs, analysis and commentary sites, an RSS reader like Google Reader can be a great place to start.

Rather than having to visit all of your favourite websites to see what’s new, with Google Reader the latest stories come to you and can all be accessed in one place.  That way, you can scroll through a list of all the most recent articles on your favourite websites, or you can browse through the latest news from a particular source.

Google Reader homepage